LIMITED LOUISE LOCKHART RANGE AVAILABLE NOW

The Perfections Of Imperfections

by Rik Arron on February 18, 2019

There's an old parable about a man walking to gather water with his two young sons.

He gives each of the boys a water pot to fetch and carry the water in.

Both pots are exactly the same except one of the sons notices there is a small crack in his pot.

He remains silent because he doesn't want to bring attention to it, but he notices that by the time they get home the water in his pot isn't as full as the water in his brother's pot.

The father never comments and so the son says nothing.

This goes on for many months as they fetch water each and every day.

All the time the son with the cracked pot keeps quiet.

Eventually the father notices that the boy is sad.

He asks his son what's wrong and the son reveals that he feels ashamed because his pot has a crack in it.

The son explains further that he hasn't been able to carry as much water for the family and he's sad about that.

He feels he isn't as useful as his brother.

The father asks the son if he has noticed the beautiful flowers that have grown only along the side of the path where the son with the cracked pot walked each day.

The son hadn't noticed.

The father explains that he had always known that the pot had a crack in it and so he had planted seeds along the side of the path which that son walked on each day.

The pot was cracked but it's very flaw created an opportunity to create something beautiful.

The cracks are where originality breaks out and the light gets in. 

Our flaws are where opportunity and creativity arise.

Our flaws make us different, unique.

Sometimes we don't appreciate that our flaws could be creating something beautiful because we are so focussed on how we compare to everybody else.

A perfect pot can be exactly the same as every other perfect pot that stands next to it.

Every single cracked pot though is going to be different, no two cracked pots will ever be the same.

I'd rather live in a world of cracked pots than a world of perfection and uniformity.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published


BACK TO TOP